Wash, Rinse, Repeat Engineering Need Not Apply

Wash, rinse, repeat – once found only on shampoo bottles – has moved into the everyday American lexicon. Now it’s commonly used as a humorous way of saying that instructions should be repeated until a certain goal is reached.

That may be so in everyday life, but that’s no way to engineer a solution for solving any customer’s fluidic challenge.

New assays are being developed that are far more sensitive than the current ones in the market today, enabling test results with ever increasing accuracy. In order to run these new assays on existing or new instruments, OEMs need to reduce sample carryover significantly. The difficulty with doing that in existing instruments is that modifications must be easy to install and fit inside the current machine envelope.

The Need:
One of our global OEM customers asked for Diba’s help designing a retrofit heater for an existing instrument that improved its performance.

The Customer Challenge:
This OEM needed to precisely heat a critical fluid in their existing instrument. Existing instruments pose particular challenges of their own: namely, that any modifications made have to be easy to install and fit inside the current machine envelope.

The Solution:
Our solution involved designing a compact and powerful heater that heated a critical fluid and a custom manifold to handle fluid transfer and mixing.

Have you had engineering experiences during your career where improving a design has added value? Or, how about where you partnered with a customer to create an innovative solution within design fluidics? Leave a comment and share your thoughts and experiences.

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Diba … Fluid Intelligence!

 

The Devil Is In The Details

An Example Of What To Watch Out For When Designing A Positive Bottom Seal Connection

Design Engineers concentrate on the materials they need to use for the connector and port, ensuring chemical compatibility. They also focus on the size of the connector, making sure that what protrudes out of the port will not interfere with other components.  Oftentimes not enough attention is given to the port and thread depths. Here “the devil is in the details,” and a positive bottom seal connection is dependent upon those details.

First Things First
To begin, ask yourself two crucial things: How deep is the overall depth of the port? And, how deep is the thread on the port?  When tapping (threading) a port, it’s not feasible to have a full thread – as the threading die will not allow it.  However, the thread can’t simply stop at an unspecified depth:  if it’s too shallow the sealing face of the connection (i.e., flare or ferrule) may not reach bottom and result in a leak.

devil-is-in-the-detailsNext, match the depth of the port with the length of the connector on the mating assembly. Take into consideration not only the length of the thread of the connector, but also the boss (unthreaded portion of the fitting) as well as any added component lengths (i.e., washer, o-ring, ferrules, etc.).

A fluidics system’s design must take into account even what may be perceived as an ordinary feature. Many times, fluid line connections mistakenly fall into that category.  And without a properly designed fluidic connection, the system will not operate to its full capacity or worse:  it could leak.

For your design to be successful, pay close attention to the fluid connection details and you might just save you and your design from you know who.

We’d truly enjoy hearing from you! If you have anything to share on Go With The Flow, feel free to drop us a line!

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Diba … Fluid Intelligence!

 

 

Diba Bids A Fond Farewell To The City Of Brotherly Love And Looks Forward To San Diego In 2017!

Team Diba thoroughly enjoyed meeting new people and catching up with old friends and industry peers at this years’ 68th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo. For the first time ever at AACC, Diba shared booth space with sister Halma companies BioChem Fluidics and Accudynamics. Our newly designed booth served as a perfect backdrop for our team as they interacted with visitors while viewing some of our fluid handling products and learned more about our custom capabilities.

It wasn’t all business though. The Diba Team made some time to catch a ballgame at nearby Citizens Bank Park where they watched the Phillies dismantle the visiting Giants 13 to 8.

How was this years’ AACC Annual Meeting and Clinical Lab Expo for you and your company? Did you uncover new technologies or sit in on an interesting forum discussion? Please share comments about your AACC 2016 experience below.

If you had a chance to chat with anyone on the Diba Team at AACC 2016 and would like us to contact you to follow up, or if you did not have a chance to speak with us and want to get in touch, please click below and we can schedule a meeting.

We’d truly enjoy hearing from you! If you have anything to share on Go With The Flow, feel free to drop us a line!

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Diba … Fluid Intelligence!

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